Boredom Buster #1: The Flame Game

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When I was younger, I used to play a lot of stupidly entertaining games with my friends. “Flames” was one of the future predicting games we used to play. Flames is a game that determines the relationship between two people based on their names. We used to enter each other’s names, names of celebrities and our crushes to figure out if we were going to be friends, lovers, attracted to each other, married, enemies or have a casual fling.

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Yesterday, I found an online calculator that took me back to my childhood days! It’s a lot of fun when you don’t know what you’re doing in life. It’s fun even otherwise. Anyway, this is one of my boredom busters- for at least 20 minutes.

I must warn you, this could be highly inaccurate. So please, don’t leave your partners or break ties based on this game.

My sister is apparently attracted to me.

http://flamesgame.appspot.com

photo credit: <a href=”https://www.flickr.com/photos/lel4nd/5599873685/”>Lel4nd</a&gt; via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a&gt; <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/”>cc</a&gt;

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How hard is it to say no?

When I’m handed candy by a random stranger, I take it- unfortunately. If I find money on the road, I will pick it up. If my friends are going out to eat, and I have an empty wallet, I will go (Just to have a bite or two.)

It’s all about temptation and succumbing to it. Moving on to a slightly related but unrelated note, corruption also deals with the same principle. You are offered money for doing or not doing something, and you take it. Bribes are an important part of a weak government and a passive population. It’s pretty similar to taking candy from a stranger too. In both scenarios, you analyse the source of the reward. If the stranger seems nice enough, you’re going to take the candy. If the man who’s bribing you seems dumb enough, you’re going to take the money.

Before you think Reecha is crazy and she would totally be corrupt, I would like to say that there is a difference between the two. In corruption, or accepting a bribe, your morality plays an important role. Sure, you’d love to buy a car that you’re not going to drive, or build a house that you’re going to give on rent; but is it worth it? If you have a part to play in helping the impoverished masses, or making your country a better place to live in- would you really take the money to eat on a fancier table?

In the end, it’s all about you and the choice you make that makes you. Money can’t be important enough for you to compromise yourself and what you believe in? Unless what you believe in is complete BS.

I think saying no is hard, but once you know what you believe in (which should be what the article says, hopefully)- it is going to be comparatively much easier.

Life is like moisturiser

I was just sitting around, watching random videos on the internet when I made an interesting analogy. I have incredibly dry skin. Not dragon scaly dry skin, but it gets all tight and weird if I don’t moisturise it daily. And I like seeing my skin normal, more than seeing it all white and flaky- obviously.

Then I thought, I’m like skin. I chose dry skin because i have dry skin. I’m like dry skin because I can be bitchy and weird when I’m not moisturised. Moisturised with what? With family, with love, and sometimes- with merchandise. If I don’t  get my cup of hot chocolate every day, I get weird. If I don’t get sleep every night for at least 7-8 hours, I am definitely going to snap at you. 

That makes all these awesome things in our lives- MOISTURISER. There are different kinds of moisturiser, and depending on what moisturises you best, you buy that kind of moisturiser. Some people need family and friends all the time. Others just need a book and a warm bed. I’m more of an in between person. 

It’s weird how I am enlightened only when I’m watching random videos.

Reasons why children scare me

I babysat this boy once. I was getting paid 7 dollars (500 Rupees) for a week of babysitting everyday for TWO hours. (Talk about under paid). But I thought this would be a new learning experience. Turned out, it was. Never babysitting again.

I went to his house everyday and helped him do his homework. I took him outside to play after that tiring task. The moment he saw a bicycle that another kid was riding, he would run towards the kid and knock him off. He was chivalrous with girls. He would then ride on the bicycle himself, making me chase him the whole time because he would go on the road. I bribed him to behave with candy after that, and it actually worked. I felt powerful. I knew it was probably not the best way to get long term results, but I wasnt the parent. 

One day, he had to poo. And he couldn’t hold it in. He ran for it, to the first bathroom he could find near the playground. Unfortunately, this bathroom had no plumbing system. And I had to call my sister to come to the playground with some toilet paper. Really, I was under paid. 

Don’t get me wrong, I love that kid and we developed this bond. However, there is no way I am ever going to have kids. Never. Even if you bribe me with candy. 

Sure you have these beautiful, inexplicable moments of joy when they say “mama”, but I’m sorry, I consider that under paid as well. I think they’re cute, but they’re going to grow up to be scary teenagers- I should know- and that is why I will not have kids. 

I’m sorry Mommy, but no grandchildren for you.

Is there privacy in a digital world?

The “Download your data” link did not surprise me and I was almost curious to know what Facebook had stored. However, when I did see the data, I realized that posts that I had deleted and had hoped I wouldn’t see again were also on the screen. Photos, messages, status updates- every detail about me was staring at me. Much of the data was posted when I was younger, probably 12. And it upset me that Facebook had recorded my entire life and had created a digital history about my life.

I definitely think this is an invasion of privacy. I could see the reality of our worlds being merged into the digital world, and I am quite frankly, scared. Seeing how humans are the “social animals”, we don’t want to be left out of this fascinating website that everybody seems to be glued to. There are other aspects that are attractive as well. We get “likes” and “followers”, which are naturally addictive, because there is nothing more addictive than approval.  The world is in digital danger, and we are helpless.

A little research showed me that Facebook has smart algorithms that analyze people, and over time, determine our interests, friends we may know and other details about our lives. The News Feed sorting algorithm is one such technology. Sometimes, Facebook, through other sources , find out about much of our personal details as well. These details may or may not have been provided by you.

Technology advancement has other cons. In 2011, there were face recognition applications for phones, made by a group of hackers, that show complete bio geographical data about the person with just a picture. I could only regret posting the pictures I did. Facebook owns them now.

Facebook also uses it for other purposes as well:

“We may share your information with third parties, including responsible companies with which we have a relationship.” 

However, they removed this clause after criticism.

This danger lies not only with Facebook, but with also other social networking sites like Twitter etc. But Twitter does not take your personal information other than your location.

Recently, a bug has been found in Facebook, where Facebook had accidentally been allowing our information to be seen by other users. This bug has been fixed, but it worries me as to what kind of information can be released. What if it’s your credit card number next? It forces me to question- Is there privacy in this digitalized world?

This was my reaction when I downloaded my data archive. And I have successfully terminated my Facebook account. 

Information from:

http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/facebooks-shadow-profile-bug-proves-weve-lost-control-of-our-data

Wikipedia.com